PRESS RELEASE

New Hope Sidetracks Art Gallery is pleased to present Resident Gallery Artists Edgar Hall of Quakertown, Pennsylvania, and André Gomes of Hillside, New Jersey in a show of their new work entitled Rock Paper Wood, opening April 26 and continuing through May 31. An artists’ reception will be held on Saturday evening, April 26, from 5:00 to 8:00 P. M.

 

Edgar Hall joined the Sidetracks family with his first exhibit in the winter of 2010, presenting paintings and drawings with colorful and complex textures underpinning both figurative work and natural forms progressing toward abstraction. He returns with new works on paper in color pencil, with the same elements but now stripped as it were for action: almost bashful hues, meditative textures and lines that swoop and sing and dance in the eye. A few representative works from earlier decades show both the contrast and the continuity of his approach over the past 40 years, most notably a seminal 1981 drawing, “Lines Within.” Edgar, together with his bride Alison, followed his Bachelor in Fine Arts degree from Wayne State in Detroit with two Peace Corps years in Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, in southern India. The cultural influences absorbed in those years can be felt both in the tension and in the repose of these mature works.
 

André Gomes from Hillside, New Jersey, joyously (as always) brings a harvest of new carvings in rock and wood formed over the six years since his sellout debut at Sidetracks in 2008. Originally from Belo Horizonte in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, André was influenced in his carving by his father before him, but remains self-taught with an intricate obsessive style all his own. He creates miniature worlds of wonder where all lines intersect, filled with repetitive patterns of cityscapes, steps and ladders, highlighted here and there with small precious or semi-precious gems and miniature carved figures. His cityscape influences include the Brazilian colonial city of Ouro Preto, neighboring Belo Horizonte. Materials for André’s new carvings include found wood panels, tree bark and steatite (more commonly known as soapstone).